Meatless Monday- Orange Flavored Tofu and Bok Choy Fried Rice


Life is still busy and leaving little time for cooking, but to be honest, we’d like a little break from the slow cooker at the Anderson household.  Tonight I decided to whip out the wok.  The wok is a great tool for a super-fast and super-fresh meal, as the high heat cooks quickly while still maintaining the crisp deliciousness of the veggies. 

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After seeing the juicy oranges in our share box, I was reminded of a yummy Orange Tofu recipe in my arsenal.  The consistency is kind of like a General Gau’s chicken or Orange Flavored Beef from a Polynesian restaurant, but healthier and with fresher flavor (not to mention no icky gristly unidentifiable meat factor.)  

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The trick is to coat the tofu in starch before cooking.  The starch kind of gums up a bit in parts, creating the yummy consistency.  

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 After the tofu and starch is browned slightly, it is set aside for a moment while sweet and fresh carrots enter the wok.  (Okay, these carrots are actually months old, but you’d never know it thanks to the DIY Root Cellar!)

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 When the carrots are slightly tender, in goes the sauce made from the juice of fresh oranges and a few other choice ingredients. 

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When things begin to boil, the tofu is re-introduced and coated in the orange sauce.  The sauce boils down slowly and becomes slightly syrupy.  

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It’s delicious over rice, so let’s make some!

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Bok choy, or pak choi, is a nutrient packed and versatile veggie that is a staple in many Asian inspired dishes.  Tonight, it’ll make an appearance in our simple fried rice.

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 I usually just chop it up much like a bunch of celery,  removing the core.  Into the wok it goes with a little veggie oil and a couple of cloves of minced garlic.

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 A quick sauté is great, and though it’s not necessary to brown it, I like a little caramelization.  Here I squeezed a tiny bit of leftover orange onto it.

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 On non-Meatless Mondays, I might put a spoonful each of sugar, soy sauce/ tamari, and fish sauce. Since the Orange Tofu already packs a flavor punch, I’ll keep the rice simpler and let the tofu orange sauce drizzle over the rice.  

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Very tasty, way healthier than the dish it imitates, and it will keep you from craving takeout!  I hope you like it!

Orange Flavored Tofu
If you are craving a sweet and sour style takeout dish, look no further! This fresh and delicious meatless alternative is for you!
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup oil (vegetable, coconut, or suitable for the high heat of a wok)
  2. 1/4 cup cornstarch (I used potato starch)
  3. 1 package of tofu, cut into 8X2 strips and well-drained
  4. 2 tablespoons soy sauce (I use tamari for a gluten-free option)
  5. 3/4 cup orange juice
  6. 1 tablespoon sugar
  7. 1 teaspoon Sambal Oelek or other chili paste
  8. 2 carrots peeled and sliced diagonally on the bias
Instructions
  1. Liberally coat your tofu with the 1/4 cup of starch, set aside
  2. Whisk together your soy sauce/tamari, orange juice, sugar, Sambal, and remaining tablespoon of starch and set aside
  3. Heat 1/4 of oil in your wok over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry it for about 5 minutes, until it begins to turn golden brown. Remove pieces as they are done to your liking and place them on a plate lined with paper towels.
  4. When all of the tofu is done and plucked from the oil, add in the carrots to your wok and stir fry until crisp tender.
  5. Add in the orange sauce mixture and bring to a gentle boil before re-adding in the tofu.
  6. Coat the tofu with the sauce, continuing to stir as it boils and thickens slightly, being careful not to scorch the sauce.
  7. Remove from heat and serve immediately over rice or noodles.
Adapted from Jackskellington, All Recipes
CSA|365 https://www.csa365.org/

 


About Jess

Jess Anderson is the creator of CSA|365 and is passionate about the local food movement. A long time member of Springdell and a busy mother of two, Jess loves keeping her family fed by honest local food.

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